POL. ADV. PAID FOR BY TUCKER FOR TEXAS. © 2019 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Please mail all checks to P.O. Box 10399 Killeen, TX 76547

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POL. ADV. PAID FOR BY TUCKER FOR TEXAS. © 2019 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Please mail all checks to P.O. Box 10399 Killeen, TX 76547

Clayton's Story

From the moment Clayton Tucker could wear his own pair of boots, which was necessary as a 5th generation Texan, his grandfather put him to work at his family’s ranch in Lampasas.

 

Clayton hauled hay, fed cows and goats, and such. Once, when he was 9 or so, there was a field fire at a neighbor’s ranch. His grandfather and Clayton grabbed two burlap sacks, a barrel of water, and took off towards the smoke. When Clayton asked why they were going to help instead of just waiting for the fire department, his grandfather told him something he would never forget: "Neighbors help neighbors."

 

With Clayton’s parents working in Austin (his mother for the Railroad Commission, his father for IBM and other such firms), Clayton went to school in Georgetown, TX. During these years, Clayton was active in both high school band and Boy Scouts. He played the tuba and is an Eagle Scout.

After high school, Clayton Tucker went to Southwestern University to study International Politics with a minor in Mandarin.

 

During his college years, Clayton gained various experience in public service. He worked for the Williamson County Prosecutor's Office, where he advised attorneys on cases. Clayton worked at the Texas State Capitol, where he researched bills and advised Rep. Helen Giddings of their effects. Clayton lived in Shanghai, where he studied Mandarin, diplomacy, and worked for an environmental compliance firm.

 

During the summer of 2012, Clayton worked for the National Science Foundation and the University of Pittsburgh as an Environmental Researcher in China, studying how Chinese coal production was affecting agriculture, infrastructure, and water. During his college years, Clayton was also very active with his fraternity, the Iota chapter of Kappa Sigma.

 

After college, Clayton spent several years in Taiwan. He studied Mandarin at National Chengchi University and traveled throughout most of East and Southeast Asia―eventually traveling to each county his grandfather fought in during his near 4-decade career in the military. Learning about economic automation and realizing translation jobs will likely disappear in the near future, Clayton changed course and became a kindergarten teacher

 

What Clayton learned from this experience shook him to his core. The USA is falling behind. Healthcare in Taiwan cost him $30 a month (1.5% of his salary!) and that allowed him to see any doctor with no out-of-pocket costs. Rural towns had great infrastructure and each farm had solar panels to make them fully self-sufficient. Teachers were paid extremely well―one of Clayton’s coworkers was a new father and his wife was a stay at home mother, his salary as a kindergarten teacher was enough to provide for his entire family, no second or third job required. 

 

Clayton couldn’t stand to see his county falling behind, so he changed course again and returned home.

After returning to the USA, Clayton Tucker moved back to Lampasas to help repair the family ranch and make it productive again.

 

Clayton authored a science fiction book called Mandated Happiness―which he describes as 1984 with Facebook―became a beekeeper, and became a rural community organizer in and around Lampasas. Clayton’s work eventually caught the attention of former Texas Agricultural Commissioner Jim Hightower. He became the Statewide Coordinator at Our Revolution Texas, a political nonprofit Hightower and other leaders founded in 2017. With Commissioner Hightower, Clayton lobbied the Texas government to provide healthcare for all Texans. With the session over, Clayton spent considerable time as a public speaker on Medicare for All, often traveling around the state.  


After hearing so many healthcare horror stories, with some affecting his own family, Clayton knew he had to do something more. Advocacy from the sidelines wasn’t, by itself, going to be enough to win healthcare for all Texans. Clayton threw his hat into the ring for Texas State Senate District 24.  


Clayton is running to be the voice of the everyday working Texans. Clayton will fight to guarantee healthcare as a human right, to stop climate change by creating green jobs, and will fight for education.